Waterproof Flooring For Homes & Basements in Maryland and Washington DC

It’s been raining in the DC area… a lot. Our friends in Ellicott City have been through another “1,000 year” flood two years in a row.
And all that rain leads to phone calls.
“My basement flooded and my insurance agent told me to call your company.”
While we hate to see our clients go through the hassle of a flooded basement, we are really good at helping them recover.
That’s where our waterproof flooring lines from Carpet One, CORETec, Mannington Adura, and Provenza come in.

If you’re replacing your basement flooring – carpet, laminate, hardwood – because of a flood, let’s talk about a waterproof solution. Of course, ceramic/porcelain tile is waterproof. Heck, they line pools and steam rooms with it.
But it’s pricey.
For lest than half the cost, you can get an amazing looking, warm, quiet floor that won’t let water bother it. Luxury vinyl tile, or “LVT” as we call it, is dominating the flooring market and its waterproof quality is one of the main reasons. The visuals are also stunning and I can still be fooled into thinking the newer looks are actual wood… even after 20 years in the business.
They look THAT good!

Email me and we can talk about what might work for you.

All the best,

Chris

Chris
Chris Moline LEED AP, CAPS
General Mgr of Retail Sales

Capella Hardwood Floors – Beltsville, Silver Spring, Laurel, Maryland

For a solid oak floor with beautiful character, Capella’s “Smooth Solid” series is hard to beat. Lots of variation in color from board-to-board makes your floor a highlight of the room… and that’s how it should be!
At least in my opinion :-]
Capella hardwood floors beltsville laurel silver spring maryland.png
Rustic grade floors like the Smooth Solid series by Capella, have the following characteristics:
Knots – knots are filled with epoxy and sanded smooth.
Filled Splits – sometimes fine splits occur during the drying process. These splits are filled with epoxy prior to finishing. This filler bonds to the wood and prevents further splitting.
Large mineral streaks – these are olive and greenish streaks common in many hardwoods.
High color variation – differences in color from plank-to-plank are common in many hardwoods. Higher grades tend to select for the least amount of variation. This does not impact performance in any way.
With all of the above, the lighter the color of stain, the more apparent the characteristic.
The color line is simple, consisting of five options
– Capella Smooth Solid Gray
– Capella Smooth Solid Saddle
– Capella Smooth Solid Butterscotch
– Capella Smooth Solid Gunstock
– Capella Smooth Solid Natural (White Oak)
The first four are red oak and the natural is white oak, which looks slightly different from red oak, but still has lots of character.
If you’re looking for a floor that truly “pops”, consider this line and you won’t be disappointed by it, or by its price!
Call 301-477-1654 or email me for more information on this and many other floors.

Chris

Chris
Chris Moline LEED AP, CAPS
General Manager of Retail Sales
Contract Carpet One

About Chris Moline LEED AP, CAPS

Chris
Chris Moline LEED AP, CAPS

I write these posts for Contract Carpet One in Beltsville, Maryland, where I’m the General Manager of Retail Sales. Prior to joining the team here, I ran a very successful showroom in Alexandria, Virginia – Alexandria Carpet One – and focused on everything from moving stock designer wools, hosting CEU courses for interior designers, blowing the doors off the internet presence, and building a fantastic shop-at-home department.
The flooring business has been good to me and I’ve been in it for over twenty years. I absolutely LOVE beautiful floors and even hardwood flooring installed on walls as accent walls.

IMG_0729
Accent wall recently installed in our showroom. It’s an oil-finished, wire-brushed wood that catches everyone’s attention as they first enter our offices. I want it in my house now!

The University of Maryland at College Park is where I earned my BA in journalism and it was an incredible experience that led to a position as assistant editor and restaurant reviewer for the Washington Diplomat. Yes, reviewing restaurants was a BLAST!!!

IMG_1009After graduating from High School, I joined the Marines and used my GI Bill benefits to pay for that journalism degree. That degree still comes in handy as it did here when I was asked to write guest columns for Floor Covering Weekly magazine:

Floor Covering Weekly Column

That particular column deals with my US Green Building Council LEED accreditation. It was incredibly difficult to attain, but it has been worth it.
I speak four languages, have three amazing kids and am truly enjoying life!
And now you know more about “the carpet guy.”

Chris

Chris Moline
Email
301-937-0030